How are assisted living communities licensed?

  1. Molly Dworken 10/16/2012 05:33PM

    It's important to know that assisted living communities are regulated by very strict licensing requirements and guidelines to operate and offer services. While there may be general federal guidelines regarding caring for seniors in a center or community, licensing of these facilities is determined by each individual state's guidelines and there may be variations.

    States generally license assisted living communities through their Department of Health or Health Services and are licensed as “residential care facilities” (RCF). In Arizona, for example, a RFC is a home providing accommodations for 11 or more unrelated individuals. Services provided by the facility are personal care, supervised care, or direct care.

    Although a physician or nurse is not usually required to be on staff at an assisted living community, the licensing regulations do cover dispensing of medication to residents. In most states, a resident's doctor signs a form indicating the person may take their medications either self-administered or from a member of the facility's staff, such as an LPN, licensed to give medication.

    Assisted living communities are inspected usually once a year to determine if they are continuing to meet the requirements for licensing. The Department of Health licensing division also investigates any complaints. All visits are unannounced. The criteria for licensing must be continually met or the facility's license can be revoked. While licensing of assisted living communities is not as complex as memory care facilities, strict guidelines provide peace of mind to residents.

    It's important to know that assisted living communities are regulated by very strict licensing requirements and guidelines to operate and offer services. While there may be general federal guidelines regarding caring for seniors in a center or community, licensing of these facilities is determined by each individual state's guidelines and there may be variations.

    States generally license assisted living communities through their Department of Health or Health Services and are licensed as “residential care facilities” (RCF). In Arizona, for example, a RFC is a home providing accommodations for 11 or more unrelated individuals. Services provided by the facility are personal care, supervised care, or direct care.

    Although a physician or nurse is not usually required to be on staff at an assisted living community, the licensing regulations do cover dispensing of medication to residents. In most states, a resident's doctor signs a form indicating the person may take their medications either self-administered or from a member of the facility's staff, such as an LPN, licensed to give medication.

    Assisted living communities are inspected usually once a year to determine if they are continuing to meet the requirements for licensing. The Department of Health licensing division also investigates any complaints. All visits are unannounced. The criteria for licensing must be continually met or the facility's license can be revoked. While licensing of assisted living communities is not as complex as memory care facilities, strict guidelines provide peace of mind to residents.

    It's important to know that assisted living communities are regulated by very strict licensing requirements and guidelines to operate and offer services. While there may be general federal guidelines regarding caring for seniors in a center or community, licensing of these facilities is determined by each individual state's guidelines and there may be variations.

    States generally license assisted living communities through their Department of Health or Health Services and are licensed as “residential care facilities” (RCF). In Arizona, for example, a RFC is a home providing accommodations for 11 or more unrelated individuals. Services provided by the facility are personal care, supervised care, or direct care.

    Although a physician or nurse is not usually required to be on staff at an assisted living community, the licensing regulations do cover dispensing of medication to residents. In most states, a resident's doctor signs a form indicating the person may take their medications either self-administered or from a member of the facility's staff, such as an LPN, licensed to give medication.

    Assisted living communities are inspected usually once a year to determine if they are continuing to meet the requirements for licensing. The Department of Health licensing division also investigates any complaints. All visits are unannounced. The criteria for licensing must be continually met or the facility's license can be revoked. While licensing of assisted living communities is not as complex as memory care facilities, strict guidelines provide peace of mind to residents.