Who do you talk to when you can't convince a family member to move into assisted living?

  1. Molly Dworken 10/16/2012 05:33PM

    If you are having a difficult time persuading your family member to consider assisted living, the inclusion of a third party who can present an objective but compassionate opinion may be beneficial to the discussion.

    At the top of the list of individuals who you may wish to consult is most likely your family member's doctor. With full access to your family member's medical records, the doctor can speak as an authoritative voice in making the case that it is no longer safe or advisable for your family member to continue living at home. Other potential allies in stressing the need for assisted living may include a respected clergy member or spiritual leader, a close friend or relative whom your family member admires and trusts, and possibly someone within your circle of family or friends who can speak firsthand about his or her experience with assisted living.

    You may also wish to call the director or counselor at a local assisted living community – one that is well suited to your family member's needs – and ask for advice. The ideal situation would be for you to persuade your family member to visit with the understanding that it's purely for informational purposes. While there, your family member may have a chance to talk to staff members and residents, take a tour, and see that assisted living communities are not something to dread or fear.

    If your family member is still resistant and you are concerned about his or her health and safety, it may be advisable to speak to an elder law attorney who can present you with options (including guardianship) for protecting your loved one.

    If you are having a difficult time persuading your family member to consider assisted living, the inclusion of a third party who can present an objective but compassionate opinion may be beneficial to the discussion.

    At the top of the list of individuals who you may wish to consult is most likely your family member's doctor. With full access to your family member's medical records, the doctor can speak as an authoritative voice in making the case that it is no longer safe or advisable for your family member to continue living at home. Other potential allies in stressing the need for assisted living may include a respected clergy member or spiritual leader, a close friend or relative whom your family member admires and trusts, and possibly someone within your circle of family or friends who can speak firsthand about his or her experience with assisted living.

    You may also wish to call the director or counselor at a local assisted living community – one that is well suited to your family member's needs – and ask for advice. The ideal situation would be for you to persuade your family member to visit with the understanding that it's purely for informational purposes. While there, your family member may have a chance to talk to staff members and residents, take a tour, and see that assisted living communities are not something to dread or fear.

    If your family member is still resistant and you are concerned about his or her health and safety, it may be advisable to speak to an elder law attorney who can present you with options (including guardianship) for protecting your loved one.